04
July
2013
|
00:00
Europe/Amsterdam

HONG KONG-CENTRAL REMAINS WORLD’S MOST EXPENSIVE OFFICE MARKET; FOUR OF FIVE PRICIEST MARKETS IN ASI

Warsaw ranked no. 61 among world’s most expensive office markets

Jakarta Records Fastest Rise in Prime Occupancy Costs
* * *
Energy Sector Fuels Jump in Houston; Midtown Manhattan Returns to Top 10
* * *
Prime Occupancy Cost Growth is Restrained Overall

HONG KONG-CENTRAL REMAINS WORLD’S MOST EXPENSIVE OFFICE MARKET; FOUR OF FIVE PRICIEST MARKETS IN ASIA
* * *
Warsaw ranked no. 61 among world’s most expensive office markets

Jakarta Records Fastest Rise in Prime Occupancy Costs
* * *
Energy Sector Fuels Jump in Houston; Midtown Manhattan Returns to Top 10
* * *
Prime Occupancy Cost Growth is Restrained Overall

New York City / Warsaw, 4 July 2013 — The dominance of Asia in the world’s most expensive office locations continued, as Hong Kong-Central remained the highest priced market and four other Asian markets populated the top five, according to CBRE Global Research and Consulting’s semi-annual Prime Office Occupancy Costs survey.

Hong Kong–Central’s overall occupancy costs of 165 EUR per sq. m per month topped the “most expensive” list for the third consecutive time. London’s West End followed with total occupancy costs of 156 EUR/sq. m/month. Beijing’s Finance Street, Beijing’s Jianguomen CBD and New Delhi’s Connaught Place CBD rounded out the top five.

Other Asia-Pacific markets in the top ten include Hong Kong-West Kowloon (6th) and Tokyo (Marunouchi/Otemachi) (8th). New York’s Midtown Manhattan (10th) returned to the top ten markets for the first time since early 2012, joined by Moscow (7th) and London’s City (9th). Warsaw was ranked no. 61.

Konrad Heidinger, Consultant at Research & Consultancy, CBRE Poland, said:
“Warsaw moved from 64th to 61st position in the CBRE ranking, which reflects growing interest into our capital as important business location on the global map. Although Warsaw has been recognized by both investors and occupiers as key destination in Central and Eastern Europe, we are still regarded as growing market that could not be compared to such giants as London, Paris, Moscow or Asian top cities.”

Globally, occupancy costs rose by a scant 1.4% on a year-over-year basis as modest growth in the Americas and Asia Pacific was partly offset by a slight decrease in recessionary Europe. However, the modest global average uptick masked significant increases in markets like Jakarta, Indonesia and suburban Houston, Texas, which posted increases of 38.9% and 21.2%, respectively.

“While the pace of occupancy cost growth globally has slowed, limited supply of prime space in key core business centers has fueled continuous upward movement of occupancy costs,” said Dr. Raymond Torto, CBRE’s Global Chief Economist. “The most expensive office markets often attract the regional headquarters of large multinational firms that require a prime location in a prestigious building with access to major global and regional transit routes.”

CBRE tracks occupancy costs for prime office space in 127 markets around the globe. Of the top 50 “most expensive” markets, 21 are in Asia-Pacific, 18 are in EMEA and 11 in the Americas.

While comparisons in dollars are affected by currency exchange rates, annual percent change calculations are based upon occupancy costs in local currency and are not influenced by currency changes.



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